What is IIS_Windows Web Server_ Plus How to Use it

Internet Information Services (IIS, formerly Internet Information Server) is a Microsoft web server created for use with the Windows NT family.

Windows Web Server first hit the scene in 1995 and since then there has been a different version of IIS available for almost every Windows operating system on the market.

We get into plenty of depth in this post, but in case you only have time to check out the tools mentioned below, here’s our list of the best third-party tools for using with IIS:

  1. SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor (FREE TRIAL)
  2. Paessler PRTG Network Monitor (FREE TRIAL)
  3. Dynatrace
  4. AppDynamics
  5. IIS Crypto
  6. Orca
  7. eG Enterprise

Version History

Generally speaking, the last version of IIS that is suitable for an enterprise environment is IIS 6 or Microsoft Windows Server 2003. If you try to use any later version of the product you will struggle to function within a fast-paced environment. Below we’ve included a brief breakdown of the version history:

Version
Information/ Additional Features
IIS 6 (Windows Server 2003)
Support for IPV6 but no future updates
IIS 7
Available with Windows Vista with more security and support for .NET framework
IIS 7.5
Available with Windows 7 with support for TLS 1.1 and 1.2
IIS 8 (Windows Web Server 2012)
Support for SNI and offers general support until 2023
IIS 8.5
Available for Windows 8.1 with more login capabilities and dynamic site activation
IIS 10
Beta with support for HTTP/2 and PowerShell 5.0

As it stands IIS 8.5 is the best version in terms of security and features. Once the beta has been completed for IIS 10 then we recommend you make the transition.

How to Install and Configure IIS

It may surprise you to know that while IIS does come with Windows it isn’t accessible unless you install it. However, the installation and configuration process is relatively straightforward.

  1. To begin, open the Control Panel and click Add or Remove Programs.
  2. Next click Add/Remove Windows Components.
  3. Check the Internet Information Services (IIS) box and click Next.
  4. Click Finish.

As you can see, the basic installation process is very quick. Once you’ve installed IIS it is time to configure it.

If you want to use PowerShell to install IIS then you can do this by entering the following command:

< PS C:\> Install-WindowsFeature -Name Web-Server -IncludeManagementTools >

See also: Powershell Cheatsheet

How does IIS Work?: IIS Processing Model

Microsoft IIS

As a web server IIS has its own Process Engine that handles all requests from client to server. Essentially a client sends a request to the server and then IIS processes that request and sends a response to the client. The processing architecture of IIS can be separated into two distinct layers:

  • Kernel Mode – Executed code has complete access to connected hardware and can execute any command. Kernel Mode is mainly used for trusted processes. Crashes in Kernel Mode are devastating to the overall system. You can find HTTP.SYS within Kernel Mode.
  • User Mode – In this mode, any code you execute are commands short of accessing hardware or reference memory. This affords an extra layer of protection against mistakes and can be recovered much more easily. When you execute code in user mode it delegates APIs to interact with hardware and reference memory instead. In User Mode you’ll find Web Admin Service, Virtual Directory, and Application Pool.

Kernel Mode has the job of using HTTP.SYS to accept requests from a client and forwarding them on to an application pool. This is initiated when the client clicks on or enters the site URL and requests access to the page. HTTP.SYS captures these requests and adds a queue for each individual application pool.

Once a request has been forwarded to the application pool, the Worker Process or w3wp.exe (outlined below) loads the ISAPI filter. Depending on the request, the Worker Process opens HttpRuntime.ProcessRequest and if it is an APSX page loads “aspnet_isapi.dll” as well.

The launch of Http.Runtime.ProcessRequest shows that processing has begun. The HttpRuntime process builds a pool of HttpApplication objects which are then passed on through HTTP. HTTP Modules continue to be activated until the request reaches the HTTP handler of the ASP.NET page. Once the request has passed on through the HTTP route, the page starts.

As you can see the Worker Process and the Application Pool are two very important concepts in the world of IIS. Below we’re going to look further at what these two concepts actually mean:

Application Pool

IIS Application Pools

On the other hand, the Application Pool acts as a container. It contains the Worker Process and segregates multiple applications from each other. This is true whether they are running on one or multiple servers. One application pool can contain multiple websites. Putting it another way, an application pool is basically a group of URLs that have been served by worker processes.  Separating applications from one another simplifies management and ensures that if one application pool experiences an error, the others do not.

Configuring IIS

  1. Locate the My Computer icon on your desktop and click Manage.
  2. Click on the Services and Applications option in the Computer Management box.
  3. Click on Internet Information Services and then Web Sites.
  4. If your default node hasn’t started, right-click on the Default Web Site node.

Configuring IIS Websites and Active Directories

Microsoft IIS screenshot

One of the main reasons why people use IIS is to deploy web applications. With IIS and the Advanced Installer utility, you can deploy web applications on multiple servers very quickly. This also has the advantage of eliminating the need to add new configurations for each machine.

The first step when configuring websites is to open the Files and Folders view. From here you can examine your current application files and add new ones. You want to make sure that your application files are placed in their own individual directory (The admin panel of the website you connect to will use these later).

Once you’ve done this switch to the IIS Server view and enter your new website name using the New Web Site toolbar.

At this point, you need to configure your website settings for HTTP and HTTPS. You also need new SSL options for your website. In the section below we show you how to configure a website or folder with SSL and HTTPS:

  1. Log on to your computer as an Administrator.
  2. Press Start and go to Settings. Click Control Panel.
  3. Double-click on Administrative Tools and Internet Services Manager.
  4. In the left-hand pane select the website you want to configure.
  5. Right-click on your Website (or folder or file) that you want to configure SSL for and click Properties.
  6. Click on the Directory Security tab.
  7. Select Edit.
  8. To add SSL as a requirement, click Require Secure-Channel (SSL).
  9. Next click Require 128bit Encryption.
  10. (Optional) If you want users to connect regardless of whether they have a certificate, click Ignore client certificates. If you want to block users without a certificate, select Accept client certificates.

Securing IIS with Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)

Most enterprise users are naturally going to want to secure their data against unauthorized access. This can be done through the use of SSL. SSL allows you to encrypt all the data that you transmit. This prevents any outside entities from getting access to data they don’t have permission to. In order to use SSL to secure your server, you need to install a server certification on the server machine.   The first step to enabling SSL is to create a certificate. This can be achieved by following the steps below:

  1. Install Windows Server 2003.
  2. Ensure that you have IIS installed and configured.
  3. Install Microsoft Certificate Services (this allows you to create authentication certificates).
  4. Open Internet Explorer and browse for Microsoft Certificate Services (http://MyCA/certsrv).
  5. Click Request a Certificate and click Next.
  6. Next click Advanced request.
  7. Click Next, then submit a certificate request to this CA using a form. Click Next. This will raise the certificate request form and add the domain name of your server machine.
  8. Now click Server Authentication Certificate in the Intended Purpose or Type of Certificate Needed field.
  9. Select either  Microsoft RSA SChannel Cryptographic Provider, Microsoft Base Crypto Provider version 1.0 or Microsoft Enhanced Cryptographic Provider. (Take extra care not to select Microsoft Strong Cryptographic Provider).
  10. Select the Use Local Machine store box and verify that Enable Strong Private Key Protection is unchecked.
  11. Click Submit. Now you will either have the certificate installed immediately or you will have to wait for it to be administered by the CA administrator.

Designating an SSL Server Certificate to a website

To add an SSL server certificate to a website:

  1. Open IIS Manager, click on Local Computer,  and then Web Sites folder.
  2. Look for the website that you want to assign the certificate to and right-click Properties.
  3. Next, click the Directory Security section and click Server Certificate. (You’ll find this under Secure Communications).
  4. Raise the Web Server Certificate Wizard and press Assign an existing certificate.
  5. Complete the Web Server Certificate Wizard process. Once completed, go to the Properties page, select the Directory Security tab and press the View Certificate button (here you can view more information about the certificate).

Virtual Directories

IIS Directory Screenshot

IIS not only allows you to create sites and applications but also allows you to create virtual directories. In IIS you specify a name that maps to a physical directory. The direct name provides users with a way to access the content hosted on a server quickly. In many cases, this is another website, but it can also be smaller media elements like photos and videos as well.

In the older IIS 6.0, virtual directories and applications were considered to be separate objects. An application was comprised of the following metabase components:

  • AppFriendlyName
  • AppRoot
  • AppIsolated
  • AppPoolID

As of IIS 7.0 and after, virtual directories and applications are still considered as separate objects but they also exist in a hierarchy. For example, one website can contain multiple applications. In turn, one website can contain multiple virtual directories which lead to a physical directory on a computer.

Log Files

Log files are used to record a variety of actions on your server. Loading up the log files will show you everything from the date and time of the event, the IP address involved, and the quantity of data transmitted. Most of the time your log files can be found here:

< %SystemRoot%\system32\Logfiles\ >

On most contemporary versions of IIS, you can find your IIS log files by performing the following actions:

  1. Click Start and Control Panel.
  2. Click Administrative Tools and run Internet Information Services (IIS).
  3. Look for your website on the left-hand side of the tree and select it.
  4. Next, click the Logging icon.
  5. Look for the dialog box at the bottom of the screen that says Directory, and click Browse.

If you’re using IIS 6 then:

  1. Go back to step 3 of the instructions above.
  2. Right-click on your website and click Properties.
  3. Find the Website tab and look for the Active Log Format section.
  4. Click the Properties button and look at the bottom of the box where the log file directory and log file name are shown.

Ports

Generally speaking, your server will use port 80 for all of your HTTP traffic. However, if this isn’t suitable for your needs then you can change it as required. You can do this by following the steps below:

  1. Open Internet Information Services (IIS Manager).
  2. Right-click on your website then press Properties.
  3. In the Properties window find the TCP port box and change it to a port of your choice.

Please note that if you change the port from the default setting when you go to open up your website, you will need to enter your domain name and the new port. For example: domainname:80 (type the number of the port you wish to use instead of 80).

Windows 8 and 8.1

On Windows 8.1 there are a couple of differences:

  1. Type IIS Manager into the Search Box on the homepage.
  2. Select Internet Information Services Manager in the search results.
  3. On the left-hand side of the screen you’ll see a navigation tree; click Default Web Site.
  4. Next, go to the sidebar on the right hand of the screen and click Bindings.
  5. Highlight http from the main view and click Edit.
  6. Enter the new port you want to use in the Port text box.
  7. Press Ok and click Close.
  8. Go back to the left-hand tree and select the relevant server node.
  9. Finally, click Restart Server from the sidebar on the right-hand side.

Third-Party IIS Tools

1. SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor (FREE TRIAL)

SolarWinds Server and application monitor

SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor is an application monitoring platform that can monitor IIS sites. With SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor you can see the availability of IIS servers and websites.

Key metrics like CPU usagememory usage, response time, and disk usage can all be monitored with this tool. If there is a problem with a site then you can automatically restart it to try and fix the issue.

The monitoring experience is driven by graphs and status buttons. Graphs show you details about resource usage and other information so that you can see how an IIS website or server is performing.

For example, there are graphs outlining IIS Average CPU and Memory Usage to show how many resources you have available. This helps you to know whether you need to buy more resources or not.

Security wise, SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor can monitor SSL certificate expiration. The tool can tell you the dates when your SSL certificates expire and the number of days you have left before that point in time. Having this information on hand makes it easy to manage SSL certificates for multiple sites or servers without running the risk of them expiring.

As a performance monitoring solution for IIS, SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor has everything you need to manage IIS resources efficiently. It is also competitively priced, starting at $2,995 (£2,308). There is a 30-day free trial available.

SolarWinds Server & Application MonitorDownload 30-day FREE trial

2. Paessler PRTG Network Monitor (FREE TRIAL)

PRTG network monitor screenshot

PRTG Network Monitor is a free network monitoring tool that can be used to monitor IIS services. With PRTG Network Monitor you can use the dedicated Windows IIS Application Sensor to monitor sent and received bytes per second, number of sent and received files per second, number of anonymous and known users per second, number of common gateway interface requests per second, and more.

While monitoring IIS performance can be challenging, PRTG Network Monitor analyzes performance right down to the application source code. For instance, PRTG Network Monitor measures the loading time of the source code to spot problems as early as possible.

Likewise, alerts can be configured to alert you once a predefined threshold has been crossed. Alerts are sent to your email, SMS, or mobile device (through push notifications) to make sure that you’re always up-to-date.

PRTG Network Monitor can also monitor physical hardware performance. In many instances, the performance of physical hardware will have a tremendous impact on the performance of IIS services. As such, using PRTG Network Monitor’s infrastructure monitoring capabilities to track hardware CPU and memory can catch performance issues in their infancy.

The performance monitoring experience offered by PRTG Network Monitor is perfect for enterprises on a shoestring budget. PRTG Network Monitor is free up to the first 100 sensors.

However, there are a number of paid versions available for larger organizations. Paid versions of PRTG Network Monitor start at $1600 (£1,233) for 500 sensors. You can download a 30-day free trial.

Download 30-day FREE trialPaessler PRTG Network Monitor

3. Dynatrace

Dynatrace screenshot

Dynatrace is an application monitoring platform that can monitor IIS server performance. Through the dashboard you can view the availability of web servers and delve down into web server process groups.

For instance, you can see active services and dependent applications with information like the application version immediately visible. Once you install the Dynatrace Agent you can also see All Requests, Response times, Response sizes, Active threads, CPU usage, and memory usage.

The fast-track configuration capabilities of Dynatrace make it an impressive tool. There is an autodiscovery feature which can automatically detect IIS web servers in your network. All you need to do is install one agent and Dynatrace will do the rest of the work for you. These services are then displayed to you on an interactive map so that you can view your IIS architecture in more detail.

Another great feature is the ability to visualize IIS service requests. On the Service Flow screen you can view an IIS service from start to finish. Here you are shown a chart which details each service request type. This feature allows you to see what processes contribute to the response time of IIS.

For end-to-end IIS monitoring, Dynatrace is one of the top performance monitors on the market. In order to know the price of Dynatrace you’ll have to contact the company directly. However, there is a 15-day free trial available here.

4. AppDynamics

AppDynamics screenshot

AppDynamics is an application performance monitoring solution that offers a flawless IIS monitoring experience. AppDynamics monitors the throughput, memory usage, Disk I/O, and CPU utilization of IIS web servers. The platform is straightforward to deploy and can be installed in just a few minutes.

The user interface is extremely user-friendly. IIS applications are automatically discovered and displayed as part of a flow map. The flow map displays the transactions that are occurring with a web server or application.

If you want to view memory information then clicking the memory tab will show you the real-time memory utilization of your resources. This information is displayed as line graphs so that you can view the change over time.

Where AppDynamics excels as a IIS monitoring solution is in its diagnostic capabilities. The tool automatically provides you with code level data if an application is slow or a bottleneck is detected. By viewing the code execution you can see where the problem originated and find a solution.

The root cause abilities of AppDynamics are essential for those who want a performance monitoring solution. AppDynamics supports Microsoft IIS Express 7.x, Microsoft IIS 6.0, Microsoft 7.0, Microsoft 7.5, and Visual Studio development server. You can download the 15-day day SaaS trial through this link here.

5. IIS Crypto

IIS Crypto

IIS Crypto is an IIS extension that can enable or disable protocols, hashes, and key exchange algorithms. The user interface is easy to use, with six main tabs: sChannel, Cipher Suites, Advanced, Templates, Site Scanner, and About.

On the sChannel screen you can enable or disable different features and protocols. There are five lists you can interact with: Server Protocols, Ciphers, Hashes, Key Exchanges, and Client Protocols. On the Cipher suites page you can reorder cipher suites.

The next most notable feature is that of templates. You can create custom protocol templates that can be run on multiple servers. This helps to make managing multiple sites or applications more convenient. However, it is important to note that you need to have administrator privileges in order to use IIS crypto.

One of the biggest perks of IIS Crypto is that it is completely free. IIS Crypto is available for Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019. The software is available as a GUI or a command line interface. You can download IIS Crypto free of charge here.

6. Orca

Orca screenshot

Orca is a configuration management solution for IIS. When using Orca you can compare the differences between different IIS configurations automatically. Configurations can be compared between environments and different points in time.

Once you’re ready to make changes you can deploy configuration changes up to hundreds of servers. Any configuration changes that are non-compliant can be scrapped immediately.

The security documentation features offered by Orca are also very useful. Orca automatically reports configuration changes so that you have a record of what changes have been made. Having these reports readily available is not only useful for regulatory compliance but also improves visibility as well.

Orca is one of the more convenient configuration management solutions on the market. If you’re looking to manage configurations across multiple IIS sites then Orca is highly recommended. The pricing options for Orca is only available if you contact the company directly. There is also a free trial available here.

7. eG Enterprise

eG enterprise screenshot

eG Enterprise is a performance monitoring platform with IIS monitoring. eG Enterprise monitors the availability and response time of transactions between IIS websites and users. Monitoring the user experience is eG Enterprise’s primary concern with IIS monitoring. The external agent tests the quality of the user experience in different locations by using request emulation and measuring the response time users are experiencing.

The internal transaction monitoring of eG Enterprise breaks down the request rate of individual web transactions, average response times, and the number of aborts by web transactions. With this information, you can pinpoint if your site is living up to expectations or needs to be tweaked further.

eG Enterprise can be deployed on-premises or in the cloud as a license or subscription. However, you need to contact the sales team in order to view a quote. There is a free evaluation version which supports up to five servers as a cloud-deployed platform. You can download a free trial of eG Enterprise here.

Tools for monitoring IIS

Once you have IIS set up, you will need to keep ahead of any possible problems. Monitoring a complex application, such as IIS takes a lot of resources and you can reduce the amount of staff that you need to dedicate to the task by introducing automated tools.

SolarWinds Microsoft Management Tools (FREE TRIAL)

SolarWinds Server and Application Monitor

SolarWinds Microsoft Management Tools can watch out for key attributes in the performance of IIS. You will particularly need the Web Performance Monitor and the Server and Application Monitor to keep IIS running smoothly. Both of these tools are written to a common platform, called Orion. This enables them to connect together into a contiguous tool. Both tools will also help you manage other Microsoft products, including Exchange Server, Sharepoint, and Office 365. These monitoring systems are not free to use. However, you can get both of them on a 30-day free trial.

SolarWinds Microsoft Management ToolsDownload 30-day FREE Trial

Microsoft Extensions

1. UrlScan 3.1

UrlScan 3.1 is a security tool that helps to protect IIS against cyber attacks. There are a number of added protections that you get from using UrlScan 3.1 that you don’t get from the standard version of IIS.

First, this tool can restrict HTTP requests that will be processed by IIS. Blocking some HTTP requests is advantageous because it protects against requests that can be part of a cyber attack.

In addition, UrlScan 3.1 can also filter HTTP values and headers to eliminate the risk of SQL injection attacks. This is done by creating deny rules which prohibit certain requests that could be malicious. To make sure that you don’t block out legitimate connections there is also an AlwaysAllowedUrls section where you can specify URLs that should always be permitted.

For further information, UrlScan 3.1 also provides log files that you can use for more sophisticated analysis. In practice, log files help to provide additional information on errors and other problematic activity on IIS. With this information, you can make changes and deliver a more reliable service.

On account of its security features, UrlScan 3.1 is an essential download. It helps to supplement some of the security limitations that come with an unmodified version of IIS. UrlScan 3.1 supports IIS 5.1, IIS, 6.0, and IIS 7.0 for Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008. You can download UrlScan 3.1 for free here.

2. URL Rewrite 2.1

URL Rewrite is another IIS extension that allows the user to create rules to modify URL rewriting behavior. By configuring URL rules the user can change how HTTP headers, responses, or request headers are rewritten.

In the context of an organization, configuring URL rules is useful as an administrator can configure a rule. URLs can be created that are easy for users to remember and simple to index for search engines.

Having URLs that are easy to index on search engines is a valuable step towards making your site or application available to clients. URLs that are search engine-friendly increase the visibility of your site. You don’t have to write your own rules for this either, There are a number of rule templates included out-of-the-box to help you get started.

URL Rewrite is also a good tool because it updates the user interface in IIS Manager. Having an integrated tool that allows you to create new rules helps to manage URLs much more effectively. As an extension for IIS, URL Rewrite 2.1 is available for free. You can download this tool here.

3. IIS Manager for Remote Administration 1.2

IIS Manager for Remote Administration 1.2 is vital for any enterprise looking to manage IIS remotely. You can manage IIS remotely on devices with Windows XPand up.

You can perform the majority of the functions you could on the original IIS without being onsite. Administration privileges can be used to restrict access to those employees who require access.

Managing remotely with IIS Manager for Remote Administration 1.2 is also secure, using HTTP over SSL. There are also automatic downloads where features are downloaded on the local IIS Manager that have already been installed on the web server. This simplifies the manual administrative concerns that come with remote updates.

For teams working remotely or looking to share control of web applications across multiple sites, IIS Manager for Remote Administration 1.2 is an absolute must. IIS Manager for Remote Administration 1.2 is available for IIS 7, IIS 7.5, IIS 8, and IIS 8.5. You can download the tool for free via this link here.

4. Web Deploy 3.6

Web Deploy 3.6 or msdeploy is a tool that integrates with IIS to synchronize IISsites, servers, and applications. When synchronizing, Web Deploy 3.6 can detect the difference between two locations and make only the necessary changes to synchronize servers. Using this tool is more efficient because it identifies which data needs to be synchronized rather than attempting to do everything from scratch.

Another use case where Web Deploy 3.6 is very valuable when deploying web applications. The user doesn’t need any user administrative privileges in order to deploy updates. However, the server administrator still has the control to delegate tasks to lower-ranked users without administrative privileges. In other words, deploying web applications is much easier and less restrictive than it is in the default version of IIS.

For enterprises looking to synchronize IIS sites and deploy web applications, Web Deploy 3.6 is a must have. Web Deploy 3.6 is available for IIS 7, IIS 7.5, IIS 8, IIS 8.5, and IIS 10. You can download Web Deploy 3.6 for free here.

IIS Resources You Should Know

There are many different sources of valuable IIS information. We have listed some of the best below so that you  can learn more about IIS works:

1. iis.net
2. microsoft.com
3. Channel 9.msdn.com 
4. stackify.com
5. tecadmin.net
6. Accelebrates.com 
7. forums.iis.net

1. IIS.net

If you’re looking for information on IIS then this site should be at the top of your list. This is the official Microsoft IIS site that provides downloads news, updates, and guides on how to use Microsoft IIS.

There are almost 30 different Microsoft-supported downloads from the site. These include IIS Compression, Web Platform Installer, IIS CORS Module, HttpPlatformHandler v1.2, IIS Manager for Remote Administration 1.2, WinCache Extension for PHPAdministration Pack, Advanced Logging, and Application Initialization Module for IIS 7.5.

Blog posts on this website include IIS PowerShell Cmdlets, Getting Started with the IIS CORS Module, and Using Azure Activity Log to Check the Progress of Deployment Slots Swap Operation.

2. Microsoft

Another excellent resource for IIS downloads is the Microsoft website itself. The Microsoft website has a range of  IIS downloads and an IIS-specific course for you to incorporate to improve your IIS experience. Some of the most helpful downloads are listed below:

Unfortunately, we could only find one course relating to IIS, but it is still a valuable resource for when you’re starting out with IIS. The course title is 10972B Administering the Web Server (IIS) Role of Windows Server. The course is available over five days in a classroom or provides you with three-months worth of online access if you choose to do it online

3. Channel 9

Channel 9 is a Microsoft-driven website which is lead by a group of developers who discuss various technologies. There is a substantial amount of video content on this site relating to IIS, including the IIS show. However, the site also features tutorial-driven content such as the Extending IIS Configuration video. This site is recommended if you want to get a feel for IIS and older versions of IIS (IIS content hasn’t been updated for some time so this is not suitable for later versions of IIS).

4. Stackify

When it comes to technical content on IIS you’ll be hard-pressed to beat Stackify. Stackify is a company that specializes in providing tailor-made tools and content for developers and other IT professionals. There are currently over 100 articles and tutorials on IIS. Live articles include:

5. tecadmin

Techadmin is a tech blog that was started in 2013 by Rahul Kumar. The site has been designed specifically to help Windows and Linux Network Administrators to get the most out of their tools. There are a number of different IIS articles on the site that offer some of the most accessible guides you’ll find online. Past articles on IIS include:

6. Accelebrates

Another excellent resource is Accelebrates IIS training. The Accelebrate website has a number of IIS courses with an average rating of 4.66 out of 5. These courses are based on 60% labs and 40% lectures so that you get the right balance of building your theoretical and practical knowledge. These are paid courses so you’ll need to contact the company directly to request a price. Accelebrate’s IIS courses are as follows:

In the IIS 10 Administration course students will learn how to plan for and install an IIS installation, as well as building their knowledge of the overall architecture of IIS. You’ll also learn how to perform day-to-day administration tasks by using IIS Manager, PowerShell, and AppCmd.

 7. forums.iis.net

While this is technically part of the IIS site the forum deserves its own section based on how useful it is in its own right. Here you can find a vast range of information on IIS and various features. The forum provides information on general IIS issues, extensions, security, configurations, web farms, performance, and troubleshooting. So if you have a question that you need an answer to, taking a trip to the IIS forums will likely include what you need.

 

What is IIS: A Windows Web Server at the Top of the Game

That concludes our guide to using IIS. IIS can be needlessly complex sometimes, but once you get the basics down like how to configure your website, then you’re well on your way to nailing the learning curve. The key is to keep at it, as learning to use the second-largest Windows web server in the world is more than worth the initial struggle you face when new to the utility.

Remember that IIS can be considerably different depending upon the operating system you’re using. If you don’t see the version of IIS you’re using supported in this article then there are plenty of other online resources covering all facets that you can think of. You’ll have to mix and match but you’ll be able to piece together more specific guidance for your system.